2018 Reading List: Playing Big: Practical Wisdom for Women Who Want to Speak Up, Create, and Lead

I feel strongly that women are meant to have a bigger role in our communities, education systems, government, and businesses. I love reading books about strong women. I love hearing about powerful women who create change. I know that the world will be better off when women no longer see and hear the internal and external arguments about whether and how they can succeed.

I believe all of this 100% and yet, I am still yearning to figure out how to create an impact of my own. I still have a strong desire to learn what it is that holds women back, and more importantly, how to communicate that to others.  Continue reading

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2018 Reading List: The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware

The Woman in Cabin 10, by Ruth Ware, was much more of typical murder mystery than my last murder mystery. This book was very much a “there’s a murder, I saw it, we have to find out who did it, oh it’s not who we think” type of mystery.

I enjoyed reading this book a lot. Murder mysteries hook me, keep me reading, and fly by quickly. This was no exception.  Continue reading

2018 Reading List: Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter

I wonder if the author’s name should have been a warning.

I am still haunted by this book. I signed up for a self-defense class because of this book. Pretty Girls, by Karin Slaughter, contained every detail of my biggest fears and my worst nightmares. I read those gruesome details and then laid awake all night, afraid to fall asleep and dream those nightmares.

Not to scare you off or anything.  Continue reading

2018 Reading List: The Bone Clocks

I feel like I’ve read five full novels in the span of 600+ pages. And when I finished, I Googled, “what is a bone clock” because after all that the meaning of the term and the title of the book completely escaped me.

I read The Bone Clocks, by David Mitchell, with my office’s book club group, and though I can’t imagine fully summarizing it in any length of blog post, I will do my best.

This book spanned time, characters, countries, plot-lines, and reality in a way that riddles the reader’s mind and defies logic. One minute I was a stowaway with Holly, mad at the unfaithful boyfriend, the next I’m whisked through Cambridge and into Switzerland, cheating friends and mentors to make a buck, relying on wit and charm to get out of trouble, and then before I know it, I’m in the trenches, with shrapnel raining down around me, gunshots in the distance. And then we’re at a literary event, full of high society and esteemed critics, where a packet of drugs puts a friend behind bars, and then we get swept off around the globe where we meet the atemporal beings who live forever, reborn in the bodies of dying children, communicating through telepathy and stopping time. And at the end of it all, we’re 25 years in the future, surviving a near-apocalypse after civilization has wasted every resource and forced its citizens to resort to an ancient hunter-gatherer lifestyle.

I promise, this is just one book.

Continue reading

2018 Reading List: My Story by Elizabeth Smart

Right before I visited Salt Lake City, Utah, I read Elizabeth Smart’s memoir, My Story. I swear, I had no idea that Elizabeth Smart was from SLC. I know that the story of her abduction was big news at the time, but I was only 12 years old. I heard her name and vaguely knew the circumstances from the 5 o’clock news clips, but I wasn’t really familiar with the details.

That’s why I picked up her memoir.  Continue reading

2018 Reading List: Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty

Based on the title of this book, Truly Madly Guilty, by Liane Moriarty, I was expecting something intense. I was expecting murder. Or some kind of crime. I was expecting drama and suspense, passion and accusations.

There was some of that.  Continue reading

2018 Reading List: The Chemist by Stephenie Meyer

There is something liberating and empowering about a strong, bold fictional heroine. Nevermind the fact that her strength lies in her ability to create chemical weapons that torture her targets and kill her assailants. This heroine in The Chemist, by Stephenie Meyer, may have had an unconventional career, but her independence and tenacity are undeniable.  Continue reading

2018 Reading List: Factfulness by Hans Rosling

How much do you know about the world we live in?

No, really. How much do you know? Do you know how many girls worldwide go to school? Do you know many households in other countries have electricity? Do you know the proportion of people living in poverty worldwide?

These topics are not typically things that are on our radar. The answers aren’t found on the five o’clock news, or in your Instagram feed. There is no headline that reads “Five families in Somalia confirm indoor plumbing is working.” There’s no reason to bring up the state of endangered species at your next happy hour. But we all have estimated answers to these questions anyway. And it is our estimated worldview that shapes our opinions about so many other things.

Our estimated answers to these questions are wrong. And our view of the world we live in is wrong.  Continue reading

Reading List 2018: What I Know For Sure by Oprah Winfrey

You hear it over and over again. Life lessons. Real truths. Things I’ve learned now that I’m x age. Things you should learn when you’re x age. The only things that matter in life.

In Oprah Winfrey’s book, What I Know for Sure, she tells us everything she knows. For sure. These are her life lessons. The things that it took her years to really figure out. The lessons she learned the hard way.  Continue reading

2018 Reading List: The Butterfly Garden by Dot Hutchinson

Welcome to the Garden, a wondrous, magical place where it’s always warm, the sun is shining, the waterfall lulls you to sleep, the grass is lush, you have friends and books and games, you have healthy food to eat, and all the time in the world to do as you please. But this, my friends, is not the garden of Eden. This is your nightmare.  Continue reading